Embellishments (3) – Attaching fabric-covered buttons to hexies

<< Overview       << previous: Day 9

Day 10

Top: Pinwheel Hexie with whip-stitched flat button *** Left: Flower Hexie with fabric-covered four-hole button *** Right: Flower Hexie with button-decorated, rimmed one-hole button
Top: Pinwheel Hexie with whip-stitched flat button *** Left: Flower Hexie with fabric-covered four-hole button *** Right: Flower Hexie with button-decorated, rimmed one-hole button


Embellishing the centers of our hexies is not only about making them pretty, but also about securing and protecting them. Without adequate embellishment, they might easily fray and tear apart. Just like couching, sewing on buttons is ideal.

On this page:
Materials and tools today
Sewing on a button – the quick way 🙂
Sewing on the fabric-covered four-hole button
Sewing on a fabric-covered button – invisibly
Sewing on a fabric-covered button – very visibly 😉
For you to do
Next time

Materials and tools today

  • some hexies, ready to have their centers embellished
  • the buttons you made
  • sewing/embroidery material and tools (a thimble might be helpful)
  • scissors
  • if you have some, small buttons or beads for decoration

Click on images for larger view

Sewing on a button – the quick way

To begin with, I’ll sew on a normal plastic button – with thick crochet yarn, but you can also use embroidery yarns.

The advantage is that I need to go only once through the holes and still have multiple threads holding the button securely on the fabric. The most important part is tying a really tight knot (= two half knots; a half knot is what you start with when tying your shoelaces).

And yes, that’s also how I often sew buttons onto garments or other textiles 🙂 The thick thread also gives the button that little extra space it needs to sit nicely on top of the buttonhole.

Sewing on the fabric covered four-hole button

I do it exactly as if it were a normal button. Here I used stranded cotton; the crochet yarn would have been too thick to pass through the fabric.

It can take a bit of probing and patience to find the first hole in the hidden plastic base, but once you got that, you can estimate where the others are.

Sewing on a fabric-covered button – invisibly

I’m using the one-hole button with a rim. I want to emphasize the rim by tying the fabric down at the center of the button, for instance with a small button (or a bead or sequin) or a little cross stitch.

As this is only decoration (and actually can be done beforehand), the button needs to be attached securely and invisibly in a different way, with small Ladder Stitches (as shown) or Whip Stitches.

Sewing on a fabric covered button – very visibly

Instead of using sewing thread and hiding the stitches, I’m using embroidery thread. You can do this with different stitches (for instance Whip Stitch, Herringbone, Buttonhole) but need to adapt them a bit – it’s not possible the normal way because of the plastic base. You’ll see what I mean.

For you to do

Try, test, play around and see how you can get the buttons onto your hexies!

Next time

On Friday Saturday = Day 11 I’ll show you how to make the last one-and-a-half  – the Plain Hexies.

You don’t need to pre-cut anything (I’ll show you a different method), but you’ll need the Large or Small Plain Hexie Template. If you only want to make a large Plain Hexie, you can also use the small Flower Hexie template.

Else:

  • fabric (two scraps for one hexie – any colour or pattern, or different, we’re not going to embroider it)
  • marking pen or pencil/sharpener
  • sewing thread and needle
  • scissors for cardboard and fabric
  • pins or safety pins

If you have any questions, please post them in the comments 🙂

Maria

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How to Make a Flower Hexie

<< Overview       << previous: Day 8

Day 9

The Flower Hexie is the third Double-faced Hexie of this series. It’s great as a stand-alone ornament for instance for attaching to bags, place mats, cushions, accessories, but also pops up from any flat surface.

plain flower hexie

Depending on fabric, embroidery and embellishments, it can look like a straightforward geometric shape, a flower, a star, or a crystal.

On this page:
Materials and tools today
Marking the Flower Hexie
Folding and stitching the Flower Hexie
For you to do
Next time

Materials and tools today

  • a cut hexie (Tip: start with a large Flower Hexie; until you know what to do, they’re are a bit easier to fold). If you want it to match the Trefoil and Pinwheel Hexies in finished size, use the Flower Hexie Template from page 2 of the template set.
  • the Flower Template and the Star Template (from page 3 of the template set)
  • sewing needle and thread
  • scissors

Click on images for larger view

Marking the Flower Hexie

Folding and stitching the Flower Hexie

The first round: Gathering the petals

The second round: Folding and stitching the petals

For you to do

Make at least one large Flower Hexie. When you feel comfortable with that, make a small one as well. You can also embroider them as you like 🙂 – have fun!

Next time

On Wednesday = Day 10 I’ll show you some variations on how to sew the fabric-covered buttons in the centers of the hexies.

Apart from the buttons you made and some hexies, you’ll need sewing/ embroidery material and tools and perhaps small buttons or beads for extra decoration.

If you have any questions, please post them in the comments 🙂

Maria

Embellishments (2) – How to Make Fabric Covered Buttons From Scratch

<< Overview       << previous: Day 7

Day 8

Of course you can decorate the centers of the hexies simply with a button, but what if you haven’t quite got one that fits? Or if you’d rather have a nice round piece of fabric in the center? I’ll show you a few alternatives for you to choose from.

By the way: These buttons are washable and sturdy enough for use with garments and pillows.

On this page:
Materials and tools today
How to cut the base
How to prepare the fabric
How to make a flat button
Alternatives: Padded, Four-hole and One-hole Buttons
For you to do
Next time

Materials and tools today

  • a button big enough to cover the center of your hexies – one side of the button should lie flat; we’re going to use it as a template
  • a piece of not-too-thick packaging plastic
  • a pen, pencil or permanent marker (should write on but not wipe off the plastic)
  • sewing pins
  • something thicker than a pin, to poke holes with (push pin, darning needle, skewer)
  • something to poke holes in (piece of polystyrene, cork board, a double layer of corrugated cardboard)
  • a few scraps of fabric, at least twice as big as the button
  • sewing needle and thread
  • tiny leftovers of batting (if you have got some), else some yarn or thread leftovers – for padding the button
  • glue stick
  • scissors, one for cutting the plastic, one for the fabric

Click on images for larger view

I don’t know why (just some of!) the photos turned out in different colours and blueish – but if I adjust them, the post will be uploaded even later… 😦

How to cut the base

How to prepare the fabric

I roughly cut the fabric as octagons (or whatever shape they turn out to be) because it’s good enough – and way faster than cutting precise circles 😉

How to make a flat button

Alternatives: Padded, Four-hole and One-hole Buttons

The procedure is the same as shown above, with the following alterations:

Padded buttons

Four-hole button

One-hole button with rim

For you to do

Make at least one flat button and one padded button. Decorate them as you like with embroidery or beads, or leave them plain – you can always add something after you’ve attached them to the hexie. For small buttons that’s actually what I prefer.

If you have time, test the four-hole button and the one-hole button (with rim or not) as well.

Next time

On Day 9 = Monday I’m not going to show you yet how to sew on these buttons, but how to make a Flower (or Star) Hexie.

I hope these very plain pictures will tickle your imagination 🙂 What fabric could you use? How could you embroider them? What kind of buttons (decorated or not) would look good? For what projects could you use them?

 

Flower Hexie
Flower Hexie
Flower Hexie
Flower Hexie

Please prepare for Monday the Large Flower Hexie template from page 2 of the pdf (as you’re at it, you can also cut the small one which we’ll need in any case for the last hexie) and the Large or Small Star template, depending on whether you are making large or small hexies.

Cut at least one Large Flower Hexie – even if you prefer the small ones. For starters, the large ones are easier to make.

You’ll also need sewing needle with thread, fabric scissors and a marking pen or pencil.

If you have any questions, please post them in the comments.

Maria